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Category: Living Building Challenge

Armstrong Ceilings Now Offers over 1,025 Products That Meet the Most Stringent Sustainability Standards

Armstrong Ceiling Solutions has added its Dune™ and Mesa™ lines of acoustical ceiling panels to its portfolio of Sustain® Ceiling Systems. The new additions bring to 1,025 the number of Armstrong high-performance ceiling and suspension system products that meet the industry’s most stringent sustainability compliance standards, including LEED® v4, the Living Building Challenge℠, and the WELL Building Standard™

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Vitro Architectural Glass to sponsor Living Product Expo 2018

Vitro Architectural Glass (formerly PPG Glass) is a sponsor of Living Product Expo 2018, an industry gathering of more than 700 leaders in sustainable design, healthy materials, green design, and health and wellness. Hosted by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI), the event will be held at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh, Sept. 11-13. The ILFI administers the Living Building Challenge, one of the most rigorous green building certification programs in the world.

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Frick Environmental Center Achieves Prestigious Living Building Challenge Certification

On Friday, May 4 at 3:30 p.m. the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy in partnership with the City of Pittsburgh invites the public to attend the announcement of Living Building Challenge Certification for the Frick Environmental Center. After more than a year of extensive sustainability work the shared project between the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy and the City of Pittsburgh, received the Living Building Challenge (LBC) Certification, the world’s most rigorous proven performance standard by the International Living Future Institute. The Frick Environmental Center is the first Living Building in the U.S. that is municipally owned and free and open to the public.

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Biophilic Design: Creating Joy Through Design

Biophilic design is more than simply the inclusion of plants in the built environment. It takes into account every aspect of the design including lighting, flooring, window placement, air quality, art, access to the outdoors, and more. Aside from the psychological and physiological benefits that people experience when working, living, learning, and healing in spaces that connect us to nature, the positive effects on our psyche also translate into measurable positive effects on the bottom line.

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Biomimicry in architectural design: The Bullitt Center

The idea for this article originated from an evening of watching “Xploration Nature Knows Best” from Steve Rotfield Productions. The episode, “Biobased Buildings” with host Danni Washington, encompassed a cohesive discussion on products and buildings that mimic nature — biomimicry in design. The show included two examples of biomimicry in design, StoColor® Lotusan® and the Bullitt Center.

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Wright Commissioning’s Net-Zero Environmental Center goes Beyond Green

Located on the banks of the Lynnhaven River in Virginia Beach, the 10,500-square-foot Brock Environmental Center was created to engage and educate the public about the environment and ways they can help save the Chesapeake Bay from further environmental degradation. As required by the Living Building Challenge, the building produces more energy than it uses over the course of 12 consecutive months of occupancy using solar panels, wind turbines and geothermal wells.

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Cypress Inside and Out as Environmental Center Earns Living Building Certification

Designed by SmithGroupJJR, one of the largest architecture firms in the U.S., the Center was built to showcase technologies and building products that contribute to net-zero energy, water, and waste. According to project manager and design architect Greg Mella, FAIA, LEED AP, preference was given to natural materials, such as cypress, to reinforce a sense of place.

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Architects design pavilion with red petal facade. Overlapping shingles are composed of Alucobond Spectra Red tiles featuring a Lumiflon FEVE fluoropolymer resin topcoat. Photo credit: Keith Panel Systems

Architects design pavilion with red petal facade. Overlapping shingles are composed of Alucobond Spectra Red tiles featuring a Lumiflon FEVE fluoropolymer resin topcoat. Photo credit: Keith Panel Systems

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Guide to Green Building – Product of the Week

Tubelite Inc.’s Therml=Block® TU24650 Series storefront system features aluminum framing with a dual pocket poured-and-debridged thermal break. Even in extreme cold climates, TU24650 dual thermally broken storefront improves U-Factors by 36 percent and increases CRF by 30 percent over a single poured-and-debridged pocket when using the same size and type of insulated glass. Optimizing thermal performance helps lower the load on HVAC systems and reduce associated energy costs, while maintaining a comfortable interior temperature. Reducing condensation can improve a building’s appearance and sanitation, and minimize damage to adjacent materials. The framing also can be specified in high recycled-content aluminum composition.

Tubelite Inc.’s Therml=Block® TU24650 Series storefront system features aluminum framing with a dual pocket poured-and-debridged thermal break. Even in extreme cold climates, TU24650 dual thermally broken storefront improves U-Factors by 36 percent and increases CRF by 30 percent over a single poured-and-debridged pocket when using the same size and type of insulated glass. Optimizing thermal performance helps lower the load on HVAC systems and reduce associated energy costs, while maintaining a comfortable interior temperature. Reducing condensation can improve a building’s appearance and sanitation, and minimize damage to adjacent materials. The framing also can be specified in high recycled-content aluminum composition.

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Cradle to Cradle Certified products

The Cradle to Cradle program certifies products based on five quality categories—material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship, and social fairness. Click here to see a list of building supply & materials, as well as other products, that are Cradle to Cradle certified.

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Curtain Walls – On Trend

These days, the word “trending” typically means that something is hot right now, but in a few days something cooler or better will come along and you will forget all about that original “something.” To those who operate within the world of architecture and façade systems, trendy things will come and go, but there will [...]

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